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Hey guys I just started the proccess of making Led sticks but don't want to make Inovas 'cause I already have a pair that just got fucked up and now they don't work, and I was going to buy some Ledz from Sonik but since GSC doesn't want me to support him or even his sticks (sadly 'cause they are awesome) and since on the LEDZ fb page says that he has some durability problems, soo anyways I just want to make some Led sticks but I don't know much about wiring and tech specs or anything, so if someone from here taught me about that, then that would be pretty awesome :D

 

And if someone knows about wiring, chipping(like for strobes or things like flowtoys), pages to buy leds or batteries or battery holders, switchs, etc, it would be awesome if u posted something

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you can still order them from sonik if you want, lots of gs.c members have, that thread was just one member expressing their opinion on why people shouldnt

 

as for costs i jsut made a pair and it depends on what you have already have but ill run down the items and their costs call pricesare in Canadian and aproximate

 

 

soldering iron

flux

a23 batteries ( 6$ a pair i think)

led lights ( get brightest ones possible price varies from 1-3$ each for those it also depends how many u buy i bought 3 5mm ones but sonik uses fatter ones wats most important is their mcd which is how bright they are get the brightest ones you can find 80 mcd = nothing )

copre wiring / speaker wire / multi purpose wire ( varies depending on how much you buy ,i bought a spool for $5)

battery case / connector for a23 3$ each

wire cutters

pliers

extra weight ( cuz i used small led bulbs my sticks were too light so i used marbles to add extra weight a whole bag was 1$)

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For the record!

 

Nobody on GSC said you can't buy Sonik's LEDs, or support him.

 

I don't and that is my personal choice. You can do what you want.

 

//back to the studio...

 

I don't support Sonik, therefore, I won't buy his LED's. Sonik promotes battling, which has no place in the glowsticking scene. You could make them yourself ya know ;0

 

If you are still really interested, youtube them. We have a pretty sweet tutorial on Inova LED sticks on GSC too. Check it out! http://www.glowsticking.com/forums/topic/11089-inovastick-v2-tutorial/

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Thanks man that pretty much has everything in basic materials haha thanks

Where could I buy like 1 watt leds and heavy gauge speaker wire(I think thats what Sonik uses :9)???

 

i got mine from an electronic surplus store in town, if you have a radio shack / source in your area then id use that, if not then step 1 is to find a place that you can buy leds wiring ect from, i used normal wire and my leds work fine heavy grade prolly just adds weight just make sure your wires have some slack and that you solder them well and youshould be fine

 

if you cant find a store in your area try ebay

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Well, keep in mind that a a23 battery has a capacity of about 50-60mAh, 1 or several 1W LEDs in series run at 350mA. The battery runs out of charge in not time.

I decided to use CR2032 batteries, 2 per stick (which are pretty cheap on ebay and have a much higher capacity), and 20mA LEDs in parallel circuit mode. This isn't as bright obviously, but lasts way longer. My first version has 3 LEDs built in and uses crystal clear glue to fill up the stick to give it some weight (which is about 25 grams), so obviously theres some improvement to be made. I'm thinking about 4 lights per stick and some epoxy as a diffuser, with crystal clear glue you can clearly see the LEDs. It's okay for the first pair i guess though.

And here's the thing:

20110830loe5.jpg

20110830003jplg.jpg

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nice design couple of questions cuz i flunked physics ( not actually but its been a while) could you post a circcut diagram i cant quite picture how to make a paralell circut without shorting it out also on your sticks how do you keep your batteris in / from being dislodged? as for the ones i described they are based and as far as i can tell identical to soniks except for the bulbs. they work pretty well but im always looking for ways to better them

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Thanks guys I just saw on the fb Ledz page that Sonik is going to post a video on how to make his Ledz yourself, and where to get all the materials soo I think I'm going to stick with that :):P

 

Well, keep in mind that a a23 battery has a capacity of about 50-60mAh, 1 or several 1W LEDs in series run at 350mA. The battery runs out of charge in not time.

Actually the sonik ones last days

And here's the thing:

20110830loe5.jpg

20110830003jplg.jpg

Those look pretty awesome :)

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The diagram looks like this:

 

led_parallellrj1.jpg

 

I use 150Ohm resistors, but that depends entirely on the color of led you put in.

 

Then I took a 7mm hot glue stick, melted the LEDs in and soldered everything together. For the battery contacts i just used some aluminiumfoil.

 

For keeping the batteries in place, just make the hole only large enough so the batteries can't slide out, but with force you can put them in. Also with the aluminiumfoil, you can use as much of it as needed to push the batteries together pretty tight. With this, they need brute force to get them out of the stick.

 

 

 

 

That's probably a pretty simple design with alot of room for improvement, it works for now though.

 

 

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so what are the advantages of a parallel circuit then? leds last longer? im assuming you used 5 mm leds, so when you say melted the leds like you used the hot glue to hold them in place? thats a pretty cool idea if so id love to see pics / how you did that. On the next pair of leds i make i might go parallel and do what you did depending on a few things.

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In parallel mode, each led gets the same amount of voltage, but the electric current adds up. With 2xCR2032 batteries you get 6V which lights up every color (white led's need about 3,2V while red led's need less) and as many led's in parallel mode as you want. So with 3x5mm 20mA led's and a battery capacity of 270mAh these sticks should theoretically light up for 4-5 hours.

 

 

 

 

Putting led's in series need a highter operating voltage, a a23 battery. They only have a capacity of about 50-60mAh though so while the current in serial mode doesn't add up, the voltage to operate all led's does. With 20mA led's it will last for 3 hours, 1W highpower-led's and the battery will be dead after a couple of minutes.

 

Keep in mind i didn't try the 12V one yet to back this up, this is just some simple physics. I am mainly a poiist who wanted to try some glowsticking here and there and i wanted things to stay cheap. And here in germany at least, CR2032 batteries are way cheaper than a23.

 

But if you want to go for extremly bright sticks that aren't as longlasting as my version, 1W led's and a23 batteries is the only way to go beside soldering in a stepup driver to use aaa batteries. And im not that experienced in physics and soldering to do that.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

edit: oh, and yeah. i melted holes in the gluestick and put the led heads in there to keep them in place. at the end i had a wired led-gluestick i put in the emptied glowstick and filled it up with glue (not hot glue, it didn't fill up the gaps, that's why im thinking about using some kind of epoxy the next time)

 

 

 

 

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In parallel mode, each led gets the same amount of voltage, but the electric current adds up. With 2xCR2032 batteries you get 6V which lights up every color (white led's need about 3,2V while red led's need less) and as many led's in parallel mode as you want. So with 3x5mm 20mA led's and a battery capacity of 270mAh these sticks should theoretically light up for 4-5 hours.

 

 

 

 

Putting led's in series need a highter operating voltage, a a23 battery. They only have a capacity of about 50-60mAh though so while the current in serial mode doesn't add up, the voltage to operate all led's does. With 20mA led's it will last for 3 hours, 1W highpower-led's and the battery will be dead after a couple of minutes.

 

Keep in mind i didn't try the 12V one yet to back this up, this is just some simple physics. I am mainly a poiist who wanted to try some glowsticking here and there and i wanted things to stay cheap. And here in germany at least, CR2032 batteries are way cheaper than a23.

 

But if you want to go for extremly bright sticks that aren't as longlasting as my version, 1W led's and a23 batteries is the only way to go beside soldering in a stepup driver to use aaa batteries. And im not that experienced in physics and soldering to do that.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

edit: oh, and yeah. i melted holes in the gluestick and put the led heads in there to keep them in place. at the end i had a wired led-gluestick i put in the emptied glowstick and filled it up with glue (not hot glue, it didn't fill up the gaps, that's why im thinking about using some kind of epoxy the next time)

 

ill keep this in mind yeah im terrible at physics its been years since ive looked at circut boards or anything like that lol. but yeah even if its less bright thats fin, because imo lower brightness means that colours get washed out less. But yeah ill try something when i have more time and $ : /

 

 

side note: want your opinion on making an led version of wats seen at 3:46 of this vid or a flow light trio if you are more familiar with the poi side. so im thinking b/w 9 and 12 leds of varying colours inside plastic tubing, im just wondering what kind of power source i should use for it ect as you can prolly tell im horrible at electronics. but yeah i think it would be cool

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Man. This is actually really interesting.

 

I'm looking forward to the LEDZ video, just so I can see any particular tricks he uses. Honestly, if those a23 batteries would only last for a few minutes on high powered LEDs, that's totally not worth it at all... those batteries cost like $6, it'd be cheaper to go through a few ultras. In this situation I would have to say rechargeable batteries would be a HUGE advantage. I know that my flowlights last for like 6 hours on highpower mode, and the circuitry inside isn't really that complicated. I'm sure without the mode changes it'd be pretty simple to replicate whatever step-up drive they use so it can work with rechargeable AAA batteries... I also really like the fact that the flowlights stay the same brightness until its dead.

 

I think I'm gonna ask my dad about a bunch of this stuff later and see how simple it'd be to implement... he's an electrician.

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Honestly, if those a23 batteries would only last for a few minutes on high powered LEDs, that's totally not worth it at all... those batteries cost like $6, it'd be cheaper to go through a few ultras.

 

You can buy those batteries in bulk from Amazon or similiar sites for much cheaper. I bought 20 for around $18 which ends up being less than a dollar for each.

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Honestly, if those a23 batteries would only last for a few minutes on high powered LEDs, that's totally not worth it at all... those batteries cost like $6, it'd be cheaper to go through a few ultras.

 

Actually 12v a23's with 3 1watt leds last days on

 

You can buy those batteries in bulk from Amazon or similiar sites for much cheaper. I bought 20 for around $18 which ends up being less than a dollar for each.

 

Soo that would be like 20 5hour ultras :P

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Actually 12v a23's with 3 1watt leds last days on

 

ive talked to people who own soniks and ive used them my self and seen them live for hours, saying days is a bit misleading and an exaggeration. They last for days because you turn them off when you arent using them. Also they are only as bright as ultras ( depending on what kind of ultras) for a few hours ( less than 1 for oj calumes and 2-3 for normal) after that they are as bright as flow toys.

 

not hating on sonik but they also arent made of magic

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ive talked to people who own soniks and ive used them my self and seen them live for hours, saying days is a bit misleading and an exaggeration. They last for days because you turn them off when you arent using them. Also they are only as bright as ultras ( depending on what kind of ultras) for a few hours ( less than 1 for oj calumes and 2-3 for normal) after that they are as bright as flow toys.

 

not hating on sonik but they also arent made of magic

 

 

green ledz are brighter then orange cylume =)

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Just wondering if you guys mean the lights or the batteries...

 

also, you can find LEDs on emazinglights (gloving site- lots of variety) -- (use my coupon code? "GSC" for 5% off. Saves you money, gets me store credit so I can buy some inovas sooner than 2 months from now-> lol college)

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Man. This is actually really interesting.

 

I'm looking forward to the LEDZ video, just so I can see any particular tricks he uses. Honestly, if those a23 batteries would only last for a few minutes on high powered LEDs, that's totally not worth it at all... those batteries cost like $6, it'd be cheaper to go through a few ultras. In this situation I would have to say rechargeable batteries would be a HUGE advantage. I know that my flowlights last for like 6 hours on highpower mode, and the circuitry inside isn't really that complicated. I'm sure without the mode changes it'd be pretty simple to replicate whatever step-up drive they use so it can work with rechargeable AAA batteries... I also really like the fact that the flowlights stay the same brightness until its dead.

 

I think I'm gonna ask my dad about a bunch of this stuff later and see how simple it'd be to implement... he's an electrician.

 

 

 

 

I would like to hear about what your das has to say about this.

 

I have seen stepup-drivers in stores here that sell for less than 1€ and are smaller than a 5mm led head. The problem is, I am pretty sure i can't solder 3 spots on such a tiny thing so didn't go that way in the first place. Also, i don't know how the light-distribution would look if you put aaa batteries in a glowstick. But Flowlights work like that, so there should be some way.

 

 

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I would like to hear about what your das has to say about this.

 

I have seen stepup-drivers in stores here that sell for less than 1€ and are smaller than a 5mm led head. The problem is, I am pretty sure i can't solder 3 spots on such a tiny thing so didn't go that way in the first place. Also, i don't know how the light-distribution would look if you put aaa batteries in a glowstick. But Flowlights work like that, so there should be some way.

 

 

 

Those are all good questions. Hopefully I can ask later tonight.

 

Could you even fit a AAA battery in a glowstick? seems like that'd be pretty tight...

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ive talked to people who own soniks and ive used them my self and seen them live for hours, saying days is a bit misleading and an exaggeration. They last for days because you turn them off when you arent using them. Also they are only as bright as ultras ( depending on what kind of ultras) for a few hours ( less than 1 for oj calumes and 2-3 for normal) after that they are as bright as flow toys.

 

not hating on sonik but they also arent made of magic

 

Actually i meant that the batteries last days like saying until the LEDZ completely dry the batteries out of charge (sorry if i didn't express well on that) and i've seen them in comparison with freshly cracked ultras and they are brighter than ultras(at least than extremeglow ultras and cyalumes) not by a lot like the difference between flowlights to ultras but they are brighter

 

I also really like the fact that the flowlights stay the same brightness until its dead.

 

For that you could like use a voltage converter so that they stay bright

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