Jump to content

ISO's...Freehand's Next Frontier?


Recommended Posts

I'm noticing in more and more videos, and we're talking about the new people as well, that a lot more people are now integrating finger isos in their freehand routine. Now I'm not saying anything negative about this, I think this might be a natural progression in the art. Because if you look at the older vids, they're more full of tracing and threads, with the occassional heli and inverted heli thrown in. Now people are doing antispins and butterfly style mind games, and other moves that seem to have been inspired from poi/glowstringing. I think the ISOs have now turned into a whole genre of its own, with a growing number of new moves coming into it. And while I've turned most of my attention to tracing lately, I'm still messing around with this just to keep up.

 

I don't really know what's the point I'm trying to make. But I think the future of freehand is fast becoming ISOs.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've noticed it to.

So dont worry, your not alone.

But yeah, this is probably just a stage of the art.

I'm personally using iso's.

I like them. lol

Stationary glowsticks are cool and all, but they dont flow in the way that I find best express's how I feel.

idk.

Its weird.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yea I know what your saying. The thing about finger isos is you can pretty much practice them whenever your sitting down. So it makes sense that people are doing them more and more. I think freehanding is starting to evolve more and more with people coming up with new ideas and running with it. I can't wait to see what new freehanding moves start branching off of the core foundation of threading, tracing, heli, fig 8, and now finger isos in the next 2 to 3 yrs.

Link to post
Share on other sites

alright. this is what i noticed. since the rave scene is more about Lighshows now, glowstickers tend to be part of the lightshower as well..

This situation makes them focus more on mid games especially those small moves in ISO's. they tend to amaze ravers eyes coz they are rolling.

 

I believe that this is actually a good evolution since this make glowstick not extinct in the presence of those gloves in raving scene. Im not trying to show off or something but from personal experience, some sober n not sober people even told me that my glowstick lightshow is way better than those ravn glove. What Im trying to say is, this evolution means the expansion the expansion of our arsenal.. Mastering both the art of dancing with glowstick as well as giving light show will make sure that freehand will never be a dying breed. This classic weapon will always be the eye-candy for everyone regardless anything.

 

Zharen, we are goin to work on our iso tricks and also i was thinkin about comin up with like a choreography. See u at the meet up in UC Davis this Saturday.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm noticing in more and more videos, and we're talking about the new people as well, that a lot more people are now integrating finger isos in their freehand routine. Now I'm not saying anything negative about this, I think this might be a natural progression in the art. Because if you look at the older vids, they're more full of tracing and threads, with the occassional heli and inverted heli thrown in. Now people are doing antispins and butterfly style mind games, and other moves that seem to have been inspired from poi/glowstringing. I think the ISOs have now turned into a whole genre of its own, with a growing number of new moves coming into it. And while I've turned most of my attention to tracing lately, I'm still messing around with this just to keep up.

 

I don't really know what's the point I'm trying to make. But I think the future of freehand is fast becoming ISOs.

 

 

I agree it is really a whole other door that has been opened with Isos.... however i dont think freehand is moving away from the dance and into just the cool tricks, when i see the veteran freehanders i see everything beautifully intertwined into an amazing performance. it has an amazing amount of possibilities to branch off from and make for some great lightshows but i don't see it as a genre of sticking in its own right. I do know that this is taking the art to the next level it was missing. I can't wait to see what everyone can come up with. Hopefully this can also be another form of inspiration for either stringers or people who haven't glowstuck to want to freehand. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

i to have noticed more of these in videos. i use them, and love them, but then again i have always been a fan of the flower patterns. but it is not till recently that i have really noticed them, or even learned how to do them. i think it is just an evolution in the art. there is still soooo much to be explored and exploited.

Link to post
Share on other sites

True!! I have seen many finger ISO's going around. Thats quite good. Its good that people are integrating more moves early on. itll make it easier to expand on into deeper moves later.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would say it's just the flavor of the month (maybe year? :P) but I don't think that will hold true. It is a new and different way to do some old moves and the method lends itself well to incorporation into other things. I'm actually sort of over them just cuz I see them soo much now, sorta like figure 8s. I have a feeling it will eventually get added to the list of basics that people should learn.

Link to post
Share on other sites

no. isos aren't the future of freehanding. in fact, the focus on that particular technique is anti-thetical to the whole notion of freehand as an OVERALL dance form. it's just one of many things people can do to add style to their style.

 

and i guess someone named "rolling" would probably say that glowsticking is more about "light shows" right now...... haha

 

i haven't really seen iso's that super impressed me really (and I'll explain what i mean next-- iso's themselves impress me but the integration with the 99% other aspects of freehand has not), and it reminds me of all the people who practice finger tuts and inner tutting without focusing on the dance. it looks good from the shoulder to your head. the rest of your body looks like crap. unless you practice everything including your entire body, it's just going to be a miniscule technique that's interesting.

Link to post
Share on other sites

As a freehander, I'm actually not integrating them all. Why? They don't work with my style, which came from a dance background. If it works for you, so be it, but I prefer light tricks that you can pull off with your whole body. Behind-the-back switches and conjuring-type tricks like Aden's summoning sleight-of-hand are much more fun to incorporate. One reason I moved away from wrap-based stringing towards poi-based stringing is because I hate having to stand in one place for leg wraps-- most of my wraps are arm-based. Likewise for freehanding-- I wouldn't want to have the rest of me stay idle. I can see isos being useful if you're a very technical freehander and want to mix things up, but for me, I turn to toss combos. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Still being new and looking at everything, I'm trying to incorporate what I like into my dancing style rather than the other way around. Isos have been trickier than some, but I don't see them as the "future" of freehanding. I think they're just another avenue of moves that will evolve into something that be tailored or personal advance/difficult moves.

Link to post
Share on other sites
i haven't really seen iso's that super impressed me really (and I'll explain what i mean next-- iso's themselves impress me but the integration with the 99% other aspects of freehand has not), and it reminds me of all the people who practice finger tuts and inner tutting without focusing on the dance. it looks good from the shoulder to your head. the rest of your body looks like crap. unless you practice everything including your entire body, it's just going to be a miniscule technique that's interesting.
100% agreed. I've critiqued videos saying exactly this.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I practice isos strictly for wrist flexibility and tutting purposes...I couldn't imagine only using isos except maybe in light shows, but even then I prefer conjuring with LED's for small crowds over sticks.

Link to post
Share on other sites

i think isos are the future, but merely to coexist with the rest of free hand

the difference between gridding and isos is that isos can be done in 3d but gridding particularly pays extra close attention on it being on a 2d plane.

isos do reflect more on the intension of making someone trip harder on lights, but traces and threading is more about dance.

and finally

i practice isos EVERY SINGLE DAY

and i must say, im discovering new ways to move em around and make em look even more trippier than before

id like to say that im on this shit like white on milk in a paper cup in the middle of a snow storm, isos will be respected, i promise.

Link to post
Share on other sites
i think isos are the future, but merely to coexist with the rest of free hand

 

To lessen confusion, this is what I meant by saying isos are the future. That they're an avenue for new moves that will probably be here to stay, but it won't take over all other concepts, it'll be used in conjunction with everything else. I'm already hooked on them and will be looking for new ways to get in and out of them.

Link to post
Share on other sites
To lessen confusion, this is what I meant by saying isos are the future. That they're an avenue for new moves that will probably be here to stay, but it won't take over all other concepts, it'll be used in conjunction with everything else. I'm already hooked on them and will be looking for new ways to get in and out of them.
Hrmm. I definitely didn't think that ISOS were ever going to take over every other concept. I don't think anyone else thought that either.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.