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cynicdave

Practical Reasons for following GSC cultural rules

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like this http://youtube.com/watch?v=Qh4VUS1xa18 ? Bring it mainstream? Will you teach everyone the cultural values mainstream? Our site is only a few thousand members. Its hard even now to teach people, but we always try. I think the best way to teach starts right here. That video was on fox. Did anyone watching that video learn anything about what the culture and history of glowsticking? Or did people see it and decided, hey I think I want to be famous like that guy.

 

decipher86, I would like to start off by saying that you're right, no one learned the culture or the history from that video clip. But that's not the basis of that show. I would expect you'd show me something other than a reality/gameshow as your example of a constructive venue that could bring information to the mainstream. Come on now, don't you think that video is a little one-sided, basically a biased example used only to show that you're right and I'm wrong? That would be like if I took a video camera to a rave and filmed only the people on drugs and said, "Hey everyone, don't go to a rave, they're ALL druggies!" That would only be showing one-side, just to win the vote of the populace.

 

And, is it so wrong for the public to see stringing in a non-rave/meetup enviroment? It wasn't like the guy was competing with other stringer's. Many people have a misperception of ravers (stringers, etc), they assume anyone with a glow stick is on E, so that was a great moment on TV where the mainstream could see that you don't have to be at a rave and/or doped up to appreciate the art. As you could tell, the crowd was entertained and at ease with the experience.

 

It's great that you all have a documentary! :biggrin2::dope

 

 

I remember reading a post about how breakdancing used to be like glowsticking now, until MTV did something and something happened (I have the memory of a retarded goldfish). If I remember which post it was, I'll link it.

 

TimmyChen, now that I've made my statement about biased information, do I even need to comment on your "educational" article?

It would be nice to recieve info from other resources. :dope

Dance is an art, painting is an art...are you going to tell me that all of those forms of expression are "diluted" because they've been brought into the mainstream? :huh:

 

 

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its not that we don't want to go mainstream, its that since glowsticking is relatively new compared to other art forms such as art (very very new in comparison), we feel that glowsticking isn't ready to go mainstream.

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to MusicofmyHeart:

 

basically, performing in an audience would grab some people's attention which then causes those people to want to learn glowsticking for themselves without much knowledge on what's behind the culture. eventually, they'll use glowsticking as a way to show off like in that vid that decipher linked us. if the culture then goes more mainstream, people will start using glowsticking as a way of competition (like everything else in society today) which then breaks up upon the philosophies of no battling, etc...

 

I thought this thread speaks for itself, seriously. many veterans have discussed issues similar to your argument, so why do we bother letting history repeat, itself?

Edited by R3DLIN3

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Most people read the articles, but to truly understand, and as I take it, their is more of an experience factor by age and also those of being a veteran that, most young people wont understand without the right resources, hence giving more credence to keep teaching it away from the mediums of highschool. I agree, glowsticking.com may make some newcomers feel like there walking on eggshells, but as is with anything, good things come eventually, It took me about 4 months to figure out what was going on with GSC but that was ok, cause I read the TOS and I knew it would take understanding through time, even if I didint agree when I started. So i read as much information as I could find.

 

A lot more good resulted from being patient and it has helped me grow so fond of gsc Values. Again, Say we did, or change rules and culture so that is would make it easier for newcomers and add more potential stringers, we'd have massive scales of things like competitions, talents shows, and battles, people physically being hurt, people dying. Actually everything I mentioned has happened historically, people get hurt. You should look up the history of whats happened. SA, GA, NCR, SOA, etc. Tons of things that went wrong. Change of opinion has happened. It all started to soldify a few years ago when policy was not set to my understanding in the beginning on the ILR. Then came glowsticking.net and the chicago compilation,stuff with people like TT. The final result is GSC, has been able to attract, people who have values and make the community strong.

 

I would expect you'd show me something other than a reality/gameshow as your example of a constructive venue that could bring information to the mainstream. Come on now, don't you think that video is a little one-sided, basically a biased example used only to show that you're right and I'm wrong? That would be like if I took a video camera to a rave and filmed only the people on drugs and said, "Hey everyone, don't go to a rave, they're ALL druggies!" That would only be showing one-side, just to win the vote of the populace.

 

Im showing you, people who dont share values, and promote glowsticking in exponential negative manner. Your not wrong, Im showing you how it goes wrong and it does. You were mentioning stuff and I thought this would clear up misconceptions. If you really want to dig into further details, please read this forum and you'll get a 2nd perspective, http://stringepeople.proboards53.com/

and videos like this http://youtube.com/watch?v=dHTaICy_Xl4

etc. Theres more to it. These are people who dont share our values. By the way, most if not all were highschoolers at the time. This forum is not like other sites.

 

No you cant compare apples to oranges. Raves and drugs go hand in hand for the most part. It doesnt mean everyone does it, but generally a truth. But their are other sides to a rave too. Etc but thats for another topic.

 

And, is it so wrong for the public to see stringing in a non-rave/meetup enviroment? It wasn't like the guy was competing with other stringer's. Many people have a misperception of ravers (stringers, etc), they assume anyone with a glow stick is on E, so that was a great moment on TV where the mainstream could see that you don't have to be at a rave and/or doped up to appreciate the art. As you could tell, the crowd was entertained and at ease with the experience.

No its not wrong, to see stringing in a non rave environment, but the fact that he was doing it for "popularity/cool" factor was what was terrible about it. Its not about whos best, or performs well. Yeah it might show that he wasnt on E so say 10 people thought about it like that, for those 10 people who thought like this, you had 100 who thought, oh i want to learn how to glowstick so i can be in a talent show and perform like this guy. Thats bad odds. Um also yeah, we also dont glowstick for crowds, for there entertainment. If we didnt have our rules, this community and helping the art would flounder. :sm_sleep:

 

 

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you know with all this talk about high schoolers, i found out recently that it's not just high schoolers

 

there's idiots in college too! O_O

 

so (with dave's consent) my friend and i did a "glowing demon" scene in our chinese club culture show last year (i was a sophomore) (we were glowing demons from hell and ripped out people's souls in the form of red ultrabrights)

 

anyway this girl saw us and thought it was cool so she wanted to learn. most people who see us just go lol hello ravers and they might try a move or two, but htey know it's a raver thing so they're not gonna go be a poser about it, but this girl for a lack of a better (or accurate) word is pretty airheaded, and she just wanted to look cool.

 

she actually did go to a few raves with us and her bf (who is also an airheaded attention whore) and on the surface this looks like a good thing; someone sees glowstick wants to leanr about rave culture and actually goes to raves to learn.

 

well what ended up happening is that raves became another attention-whore-venue for htem, mostly him though. i mentioned this couple in another thread about "who is 'qualified' for you to introduce glowsticking to". we could feel sorry for this guy's lack of self-esteem if he didn't keep taking our lights, sticking them in front of our faces unceremoniously with the air of "look at what i can do! i saw you doing this earlier, aren't i good?"

 

and both of them would go off doing that. i thoroughly regret introducing them to the raving community. after that htey've started a lot more trouble (and bad vibes, not by being overtly obnoxious but you don't have to do that to be unliked), to the point where the only way this could have been prevented is if we didnt glowstick demon at all.

 

even though we had ABSOLUTELY no other problem with other college students.

 

the moral of the story is, airheads like these are a lot more common in high school, b/c in college there is no notion of bandwagoning (unless you're an airheaded poser like the above), so it's generally accepted, over years and years of moderators giving high shcoolers chances, that you shouldn't expose high schoolers to it.

if i had this problem in a mature college setting, imagine how many times worse it would have been in high school

Edited by electronic_heartbeat

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It seems to me that another great reason is that the pioneers of the art don't want it spread in high school, so that's OUR terms. you can choose to ignore us, but we aren't going to let you come onto glowsticking.com

 

Feel free to disagree about our policies all you want, but seriously, until you've been sticking for a few years and have people who learn from you and are respected in the community, good luck trying to convince us. Most people who argue simply have no credibility and will never gain it, because they never tend to continue the art.

 

Here is a hypothetical scenario that somehow might lead to glowsticking.com accepting glowsticking in high school.

 

Some long time glowsticking.com member who has made many new contributions to the field, who is well known as a respected member of the community, starts teaching at a local high school. using his/her knowledge of educational concepts he has gotten from teaching subjects such as history, he formulates a concept for a syllabus and some kind of member based system to make it possible to spread glowsticking in a way that does not dilute the culture. he also brings out a pamphlet and holds an administrator meeting explaining the concepts behind the scene to various teachers so misunderstandings do not result.

 

this scenario fulfills several criterions.-- credibility, expertise in the subject matter in both glowsticking culture AND the mandatory school system and educational concepts for underage minors.

 

note that none of this would work if it was some underage minor in high school attempting to explain to a lax (and intellectually vacant but tolerant) teacher in order to gain the sponsorship needed for a glowsticking club. neither would it work if some random adult teacher decided to take it upon himself to start this-- he would need the consent and approval of the glowsticking community.

 

and honestly, there is no other community with this much contributions to the glowsticking field.

 

but hey, you can try.

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the worst part about someone throwing strings in high school (where im from at least) is whether you do drugs or you dont, the school teachers and students are going to label you as a "x-head" or something to that effect.....then its gunna get to your parents cus the school is going to be "worried" about you, this and that.....just not a place you want ta have all that drama...

 

shit, even if your seen throwing in public by the police it is considered "drug paraphernalia" in the small town where im from, HA!!! and then they will proceed to search you and your vehicle and what not..........

 

musicofmyheart, I've quoted myself so that you could read it (if you havnt already). I think there was a large mis-conception that you might have had after reading over this post. GS.c isn't saying not to teach it to someone in high school, rather, dont do it in high school.

 

In RaverCandyGirls thread Online "friendships", any thoughts? TimmyChen references to a comment made in 7 reasons the 21st century is making you miserable

In the '7 Reasons Why The 21st Century is Making You Miserable' post under the "Cafe Intellect" section, it said something about "more than 40 percent of what you say in an e-mail is misunderstood." That's something we should all keep in mind.

(I chose to reference RCG's thread as opposed to directly referencing the 7 reasons thread because I personally have not read that thread.)

 

At anyrate, I believe this happend here. I myself had issues with this type of thing when I joined GS.c and starting actively posting in the forums for the first time. I am a person that questions "guidlines/rules" not to test authority, but because I learn more of the reasoning for them from the discussion than simply reading the list. Granted, there is a search option to look for similar discussions, but they don't always ask the questions that you might want asked...and as I mentioned above, you might relate better to being actively in the discussion than reading someone elses.

 

It seems to me that people who attempt to openly debate under these reasonings are abruptly criticized for doing so. Much of the reason for this (imo) is under the same premises that string throwers are considered "drugies/x-heads". You are stereo-typed as immature and uncognizant because so many others before you have asked the same questions for the wrong reasons; although they were truely in disagreement and close minded about the ideas of battling, crews, ect. So, regardless of the fact that you choose to use this as a learning tool, you are grouped together and stoned. (hehe :D )

 

In the same respect, you (people in general) should read their posts and make sure that they aren't coming off too strong, or that it may be mistaken in a way it was not meant to be. From the past threads that I've read, this seems to be a major issue, in the fact that discussions turn into heated arguements and every word is taken out of context. That is why I enjoyed this thread that Dave wrote so much, All long time members and new members.

 

A helpful piece of advice (again imo), some people (myself included, at first) few this as a "my way or the highway" type forum. It is, however, within reason. If you just blatanly disrespect the forum/rules/culture/Dave/Staff/members ect. with no regards of bringing positive influence into the community, you will be banned. No where in this site have I ever seen anyone tell another that they cannot think a certain way. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, and can express that opinion.

 

The important thing to remember is that tact is everything. If you realize that you were taken in a wrong manner, or you feel someone is "flaming" you for your opinion, be mature enough to not become aggressive in your retorts or you will be perceived as a nuisance (remeber, perception is reality). Calmly express your thoughts and try your best to clear up any misconceptions. GS.c is definitely very understanding and forgiving. Trust me, I'm telling you this through experience :sm_biggrin:

 

Back to the matter at hand, I agree with you on your comments about taking it "mainstream" and I don't at the same time. True, it is an artform and everyone is entitled to learn it. However, the slower and more care you put into the transition in doing such, the better outcome and exponintial growth you will have at its endstate. You will always have those stragglers that "want to be cool" or "want to show off", it's just going to happen regardless of what you do. Take high school sports for instance; how many people join for the sole purpose of "fitting in" because the popular thought is that you will be cool in doing so? The only hope that you have is to go slow and build a strong community before this takes place so that the number of people who want to learn the culture out number those who want to be cool!

 

I really hope this helps with your questioning, and that you can understand the reasonings a little better!?

Edited by Cray-Z Style

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Guest wuxanaXan

in truth,

glowsticking and plur are ideals and arts

that are sought out by individuals

it is something to be learnt for what it is

just as breakdancing, c-walking, krumping, all of that used to be

they used to be things that people seek as a way to enlighten themslelves,

to isolate themselves from the norm, to have a sense of individuality

by those who know it on the deeper level,

it is truly a talent to be cherished between those who care so.

however, when it goes mainstream (just as those underground forms of dancing have)

it loses meaning amongst those who had done so much to achieve

because those who are new in the mainstream era take so little effort and practice

and...

its not like someone can create a reality show

based upon glowsticking, even if they are trying to introduce the culture behind it

every show has a trend, a certain character personality,

that makes it appeal to the public

what make glowsticking what it is here on this site

is the diversity that comes together from everyone on this site

too diverse in fact, that it can neither be contained in a show, nor "accurately" stereotyped.

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To be honest, I don't think the "walking on eggshells" feeling mentioned before comes from the actual policies of gs.c. I happen to agree with all the things gs.c stands for but I can still relate to that feeling. I think it comes more from the tone of impatience many people have when answering questions that have been asked and debated on gs.c exhaustively. Which is reasonable, since obviously when you hear the same question a hundred times, especially when that question is almost entirely asked by newer members, it gets, well, repetetive. However, when I keep reading how 'this question has been asked a thousand times/debated many times by longer-time members,' all I can think is that the first or first few times when these questions were brought up, those opposed to either what was or would become the official stance didn't get that same attitude simply because they asked it earlier. Again, that's a pretty reasonable reaction, plus not everyone gives off that impression anyways. Just my opinion as to (part of) why many new people feel like that.

 

Also,

"too diverse in fact, that it can neither be contained in a show, nor "accurately" stereotyped"

I don't think anything can be accurately stereotyped, but everything can be (and is) stereotyped; glowsticking included.

Edited by courtjester

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To be honest, I don't think the "walking on eggshells" feeling mentioned before comes from the actual policies of gs.c. I happen to agree with all the things gs.c stands for but I can still relate to that feeling. I think it comes more from the tone of impatience many people have when answering questions that have been asked and debated on gs.c exhaustively. Which is reasonable, since obviously when you hear the same question a hundred times, especially when that question is almost entirely asked by newer members, it gets, well, repetetive. However, when I keep reading how 'this question has been asked a thousand times/debated many times by longer-time members,' all I can think is that the first or first few times when these questions were brought up, those opposed to either what was or would become the official stance didn't get that same attitude simply because they asked it earlier. Again, that's a pretty reasonable reaction, plus not everyone gives off that impression anyways. Just my opinion as to (part of) why many new people feel like that.

 

Also,

"too diverse in fact, that it can neither be contained in a show, nor "accurately" stereotyped"

I don't think anything can be accurately stereotyped, but everything can be (and is) stereotyped; glowsticking included.

This is a pretty astute statement right here. It's nice to see a new member who has some insight into the why's behind this issue. And you're quite right concerning many of us. When I first came here, I was all fire and brimstone about the issue, and I'd answer it every time. Nowadays, I only jump on the topic if someone is really causing trouble or it's a really hot debate. Fact is, when we see a new "battling in school" thread, I think a lot of us just figure one of the others will get to it. And like you said, it does get exhausting. That's the trouble with this issue. It gets so tiring having to repeat ourselves over and over that for some that exhaustion eventually becomes apathy - which sends the wrong message entirely.

 

Sometimes even the staff and veterans need a reminder that to have a strong belief means you have to defend it a lot. Then again, it's unreasonable to think that the articles concerning our stance and all the previous threads on the subject (and there are a lot of them), should be overlooked. That's the other problem: we really shouldn't have to repeat ourselves over and over with the resources available here. So, how do we get people to figure it out themselves? Well, we still haven't nailed that one down 100%.

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alot of people that i hang out with unfortunatly do not understand that you shouldnt glowstick at a high school dance. every dance... there they are w/ their glow sticks... looking like complete fools. everyone seems obsessed w/ the idea of the "energy ball" that you pass around and fiddle with for a bit. they all end up looking realy stupid. why does noone get this... i dont know.

 

here's the best reason to not bring glowsticks to a dance. unless youre heavily involved in circles at raves, youre going to just be standing there all lit up and looking like a dumbass with nothing to dance to, because high school DJ's are not techno DJ's and the only thing theyre gona play is sandstorm and maybe satisfaction if youre lucky.

 

also, youre inevitably going to end up in a battle with some cocksure obnoxious guy who is only trying to impress some chick; then, you both get to look like idiots.

 

summary: techno at high school dances = sucky: its going to take a miracle for you to find anything decent

 

 

last i checked the point of dance was to have fun, not to not look like an idiot

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ok, i looked a lil more into it, and i wanna semi-retract my last post. i read an article and i understand why we dont want raving at high school. i just kinda took a lil offense to the post i replied to and probly should of kept my mouth shut.

 

my thing is that everyone at my school that knows me, knows me as a raver, and they'de be pretty suprised if i didnt glowstick at a dance. i did at my last dance, BEFORE reading anything here (apologies) but no one else rly got into it, a couple ppl asked to see my strings, tried, said they couldnt do it and walked off, but they had fun trying.

 

my point with that is that i dont think any bad is gonna come from me glowsticking at my school. (hopefully) if it goes the same as last time. i wasnt trying to show off, gain popularity or anything, i was just expressing myself and havin fun. plus im too young for most clubs, and dancing in my bedroom only goes so far.

 

but if yall rly dont think i should, even though from minimal experience i can say it wouldnt spread so mainstream like described in the gsc article i read, then i wont at school

 

what do yall think?

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its not about you but the rest of people in your school, look, seriously you look like someone that means no harm whatsoever to the culture, that's why you have to take word of those that have experience on the subject, dave could actually tell you himself, you wouldnt believe so yourself, but when your in high school you think of becoming somebody, those that play guitar just wanna showoff, those that play sports love it but often show off, i'm not saying that's in every school, but in most of them, popularity is a big thing, and

 

underground does not mean just do it at your house, we incentive you going to real raves and practicing the art, but even in this situation some people create a lot of ego and turn into harsh critics and then battlers, that's why we dont approve raving at schools, because they dont know the culture!!

 

you can be the sickest glowsticker but not even care about that, because you actually havent thought about it!! and it's not worth it!! just enjoy!!

 

you dont compare between artists (who's better than the other), when you see some of the most respected artists, they dont brag on their creation, but they enjoy it because they love creating!!

 

tell me what are your thoughts!! just do this, ask your friends what is raving, bring the answer to us, and then you can see what we are talking about!! glowsticking is a subculture in the rave world that comes from the art of poi!!

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ha i saw this discussion and i couldn't help but feel totally embarassed. i got raving from the teen nights at clubs and i thought it was really cool and i wanted to learn. little did i know it was such a serious art form (mind you i was around 14 im 18 now).

 

there was a talent show kinda thing in my school last month and my brother and i tried out doing like a rave routine i guess you can call it. well we made it. the reason i did it was in my mind i thought it would be another way of introducing a different type of dance culture to people. let them know there's something different out there. awesomely enough we had great feedback everyone loved it not one negative thing was said. to me and my brother atleast. while we were performing the energy fromthe audience was breath takingly ecstatic. so i thought we did a good thing.

 

reading this forum is now making me question if what i did was actually right. in no way did i ever think i wud be disrespecting the art, to the contrary i thought i was promoting it positively.

 

any thoughts on this would be great :)

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its not about you but the rest of people in your school, look, seriously you look like someone that means no harm whatsoever to the culture, that's why you have to take word of those that have experience on the subject, dave could actually tell you himself, you wouldnt believe so yourself, but when your in high school you think of becoming somebody, those that play guitar just wanna showoff, those that play sports love it but often show off, i'm not saying that's in every school, but in most of them, popularity is a big thing, and

 

underground does not mean just do it at your house, we incentive you going to real raves and practicing the art, but even in this situation some people create a lot of ego and turn into harsh critics and then battlers, that's why we dont approve raving at schools, because they dont know the culture!!

 

you can be the sickest glowsticker but not even care about that, because you actually havent thought about it!! and it's not worth it!! just enjoy!!

 

you dont compare between artists (who's better than the other), when you see some of the most respected artists, they dont brag on their creation, but they enjoy it because they love creating!!

 

tell me what are your thoughts!! just do this, ask your friends what is raving, bring the answer to us, and then you can see what we are talking about!! glowsticking is a subculture in the rave world that comes from the art of poi!!

 

 

ok, i wont glowstick at my school, i understand why i shouldnt. thank you. =)

 

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ha i saw this discussion and i couldn't help but feel totally embarassed. i got raving from the teen nights at clubs and i thought it was really cool and i wanted to learn. little did i know it was such a serious art form (mind you i was around 14 im 18 now).

 

there was a talent show kinda thing in my school last month and my brother and i tried out doing like a rave routine i guess you can call it. well we made it. the reason i did it was in my mind i thought it would be another way of introducing a different type of dance culture to people. let them know there's something different out there. awesomely enough we had great feedback everyone loved it not one negative thing was said. to me and my brother atleast. while we were performing the energy fromthe audience was breath takingly ecstatic. so i thought we did a good thing.

 

reading this forum is now making me question if what i did was actually right. in no way did i ever think i wud be disrespecting the art, to the contrary i thought i was promoting it positively.

 

any thoughts on this would be great :)

hindsight is always 20/20. it's really hard to see the whole bigger picture when you are right there in the moment.

 

the "great feedback" you have received is exactly what the articles (and all the veterans' collective experience) is talking about. i am sure you are not the only one that had sense this. quite a few of the audience probably either consciously or subconsciously thought that the popularity or fame you guys received were awesome and would like to duplicate this themselves.

 

the problem is that all they saw was the form and they did not receive any cultural, philosophical, or background information that goes along with the dance. that's how an art form like this will get diluted.

 

please make sure you read through the article if you havn't yet.

 

http://www.glowsticking.com/nu/index.php?i...=95&catid=4

 

i hope this helped you understand the importance of not spreading glowsticking in high school more. thank you for your patience. =)

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hindsight is always 20/20. it's really hard to see the whole bigger picture when you are right there in the moment.

 

the "great feedback" you have received is exactly what the articles (and all the veterans' collective experience) is talking about. i am sure you are not the only one that had sense this. quite a few of the audience probably either consciously or subconsciously thought that the popularity or fame you guys received were awesome and would like to duplicate this themselves.

 

the problem is that all they saw was the form and they did not receive any cultural, philosophical, or background information that goes along with the dance. that's how an art form like this will get diluted.

 

please make sure you read through the article if you havn't yet.

 

http://www.glowsticking.com/nu/index.php?i...=95&catid=4

 

i hope this helped you understand the importance of not spreading glowsticking in high school more. thank you for your patience. =)

 

yeah i acutally read the entire article before i made my post. i found it very interesting and i guess true in most cases. i was able to understand it alot cause im a high school senior and i see all that crap everyday.

 

but in any case you live and learn and im glad i came across this topic. and i guess your right because the people only saw what we were doing, but not the actual culture behind it. guess it was just something "cool" to watch. *sigh* whatever wish i read this 2 months ago haha.

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yeah i acutally read the entire article before i made my post. i found it very interesting and i guess true in most cases. i was able to understand it alot cause im a high school senior and i see all that crap everyday.

 

but in any case you live and learn and im glad i came across this topic. and i guess your right because the people only saw what we were doing, but not the actual culture behind it. guess it was just something "cool" to watch. *sigh* whatever wish i read this 2 months ago haha.

just make sure it doesn't happen again. =) and help pass the knowledge.

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OK i am new to P.L.U.R understand the rule and agree with them but where are some places i can glowstick and practice besides my room cause i am from michigan and there is not much happening in this state. also non of my friends realy care for the the techno music so im pretty much off on my own. any suggest?

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you can check out our midwest regional section to find people near you.

 

i saw that you already posted a new thread asking for people in Michigan and that's a very good start. if you navigate to the second page of that section, or try using the search function.. you can find others in Michigan. here's a thread i pulled from page 2:

 

http://www.glowsticking.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=6675

 

try posting there or PM some of them. you can look at their profile and see when they were seen last active, that way you can pick out the people that are the most likely to see your message. =)

 

 

also depends how old you are and how independent you are, you can also consider traveling further to meet up with fellow glowsticking.com members. you can consider some chicago events and keep an eye on those. me and some people will probably be at the Sasha & Digweed event at the House of Blues in chicago coming April. I will post about it once the plans are more solidified.

 

some people like me also takes a trip once a year traveling to california for big events and meetups like EDC.

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ya im 17 but pretty indepentent so i kinda have to stay to underground party or no age limit but im moving to Florida so im hoping there will be more out there and thanks for the link.

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Glowsticking.com has tried to explain the thoughts in a thorough manner, but it seems like there is just way too much information going around about why 1) you shouldn't glowstick in high school or your high school dance 2) you shouldn't battle 3) you shouldn't form separate crews.

 

Ohh gawd. Senior year for one of the idiotic assemblies they had a themed dance called Raving. Mostly a bunch of idiots wearing candy and holding glow sticks and doing the robot or moon walk. I shook my head and walked out.

 

Never went to any of my school dances, mostly because all they place is the same society likes rap crap all the time.

 

I 100% agree with number one. Numero dos though. Battling in which form. I dont exactly battle in competition but Ill get a few people together and do transitions from one glowsticker to another. Basically when they throw their arms towards me at their stop point itll be my start point and just go from one to another. The fluid of motion is awesome. So I dont think this is battling, but correct me if Im wrong.

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