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Ph0toN

Sponsorship - Getting Paid To Glowstick?

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adding to what photon said

 

IMO a lot of it is the reason behind why you are doing something ( hopping on stage accepting free w.e) if you go to a party (edm party not a generic house party) and you're stringing or freehanding and someone talks to you after and offers you a drink then IMO thats fine because you didnt go there with the intention of getting a free drink

 

same thing with a party wher eu jump on a tble or on stage, if you did it simply because there was no space any wher eelse then thats fine, but dont do it strictly to show off ( in other words dont go on stage just so people look at you)

 

in short when ever you are wonding if it is ok to do something ask yourself why you are doing it, remember glowsticking / strigning should first and foremost be done for you / be you expressing yourself

 

________________________________

 

side note: now thats not to say you cant keep your "audience" in mind when preforming, a friend of mine and i had a running joke about poi-ists using buzz saws, so id occasionally do them just for fun / as a joke ( usally i dont do them at all)

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As for my opinion on the "people make money off of all kinds of other arts" thing, those arts came from radically different environments. Glowsticking and the light related dances came from the rave scene, which is all about caring / sharing / giving / love etc. In a sense, paying someone for glowsticking is like paying them for a hug. It's something that should have been given freely in the first place.

 

Also, those other arts have mass followings of people who are willing to pay to see them. Glowsticking doesn't have that kind of following. Those other arts have had multiple decades, centuries, or millennia to evolve and gain the followings they have, whereas glowsticking is still a relatively new art form that's not widely accepted or known, and the majority of the following that it has doesn't want to be paid to do it, nor do they believe it's right to get paid to do it. If these things ever change in the future then GSC stances will probably change.

 

I am bumping this thread because I feel this is something that we should be actively talking about. :) photon really hit it home here. I want to emphasize that when you are glowsticking at an event/ club or whatever, there is an aspect of you adding to the experience for many others around you. It really is like 'giving someone a hug' and getting paid to do this really contradicts what the rave scene is all about :) i'd love to see more discussion on this topic

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Well, I agree with some of the points in this article. However, there are some of them which I don't agree completely.

 

As a preamble, I would like to say that this is just my own personal opinion and I'm not looking to attack anybody. I just want to express some of my thoughts and opinions politely.:yes

 

I believe that equality is one of the most important values in our social life. As we know, this is clearly reflected in the raving culture. For this reason, I agree with the author that battles are not in the best interest for the raving scene's development and harmony. I really admire those talented people that can rave amazingly, and instead, they wish to teach everybody else.":unworthy:"

 

They can have all the talent in the world and could easily stand out of everyone else, but they don't.:dope

 

However, I do not think that being sponsored is entirely bad. The author exposed a very valid opinion about, how can I say this, ... "once you've started the path of the dark side, it will dominate you forever". That is one case.

 

There are other cases. For example, what if, the person being sponsored isn't that greedy, and has strong value principles that come from his or her own education background. That person should be OK because he/she is making a something productive with something he/she really likes. It's not immoral in any way. It doesn't make that person any better, nor it changes his/her status.

 

What if he/she really needs the money?:question:

 

As in any other job, it is honest as long as the person follows the principles of rectitude. This might require self-discipline.

 

I believe that raving is an art that we need to share with the world. Raving can bring happiness, joy, laughter, and peace, if we know how to do it wisely, as the author quotes in the first sentence of the article.:book:

 

It is true that some people might want to attract everyone's attention by getting on top of a stage and start raving. After all, that is what the stage is made for. But it all depends on the intentions prior to this. I agree again with the author that there might be somebody that wants to show off, and it shouldn't be like this.

 

The raving community does right in condemning these immoral actions.:thumbup:

 

But what if somebody just wants to show what he/she likes to do. For example, in a party, with friends or not, somebody feels good and confident enough to rave for everyone to see. This is not showing off, this is sharing. And it shouldn't be considered as a wrong action under these circumstances. If so, then raving should be practiced in secret, and that would be selfish, and therefore going against our beloved raving principles.:rtfm:

 

In conclusion, I would like to remark that this is my personal opinion, without searching any kind of compensation, keeping myself as neutral as possible. I just want to make a contribution to the raving culture that might be useful and shed some light on one of the most discussed and important topics of the raving scene.

 

I would also like to thank and congratulate the author for providing us with his valuable point of view in this forum, and being able to listen other's opinions and thoughts.:clap:

 

A good raver knows that raving principles are extremely important, no matter the situation, and can wisely overcome any situation with the light of his/her glowsticks.;)

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EDIT:

 

Commence text wall!!

 

I know some of you will see this post and say "wow that is way too long, I'm not reading that". READ THIS. Spend the next 5 minutes of your life learning about glowsticking culture. If you are a part of this community, this is in your best interest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I would also like to thank and congratulate the author for providing us with his valuable point of view in this forum, and being able to listen other's opinions and thoughts.:clap:

First things first

This article was not intended to be an "opinion of the author" type article. This is actually one of the issues that this whole community stands for.

 

You are confusing the terms glowsticking, and "raving". When someone is glowsticking, it is not called "raving". The article wasn't about "raving culture", it was about "glowsticking culture". At GSC, we are concerned with preserving the original culture that ties along with glowsticking (although, the same culture could apply to the entire "rave" scene in general...)

 

here is the thought process.

 

Glowstring for money :arrow: competition for sponsorships. Competition has no place in glowsticking culture, or the rave scene in general. This also tends to lead to battling, since sponsors usually want to sponsor who they think are the "best" glowstickers.

 

As we know, this is clearly reflected in the raving culture. For this reason, I agree with the author that battles are not in the best interest for the raving scene's development and harmony.

 

You did mention that you were against battling, but if someone is sponsored, glowsticking is all the sudden all about "who is better than everyone else". Other people will see that person getting paid to glowstick, and possibly say "hey, I'm better than him, why can't I get paid?". That person is now more inclined to battle the sponsored glowsticker in order to win favor by the sponsor. That is not what Glowsticking is about. As a community, we are strictly against battling.

 

Furthermore, glowsticking for money can lead to people being viewed as unequal. One is a "better" glowsticker than another etc etc. This just goes against the original intentions behind the "rave scene" in general.

 

The author exposed a very valid opinion about, how can I say this, ... "once you've started the path of the dark side, it will dominate you forever". That is one case.

I don't really think that is why we are against glowsticking for money

 

There are other cases. For example, what if, the person being sponsored isn't that greedy, and has strong value principles that come from his or her own education background. That person should be OK because he/she is making a something productive with something he/she really likes. It's not immoral in any way. It doesn't make that person any better, nor it changes his/her status.

 

The issue is not that we don't want "greedy" people making money glowsticking. It is that we don't want anyone making money glowsticking. Being greedy, not having a strong education background, and having a bad set of moral principles is not really what we are trying to prevent here... We are trying to prevent exactly what I just listed above: battling, competition, and also people being viewed by others as "unequal" (among several other things).

 

What if he/she really needs the money?:question:

 

There are PLENTY of other ways to make money. If someone, like yourself, really cared about glowsticking, than why would you risk the deterioration of glowsticking culture by glowsticking for money?

Worst case scenario, go work at McDonalds kids...

 

 

I believe that raving is an art that we need to share with the world. Raving can bring happiness, joy, laughter, and peace, if we know how to do it wisely, as the author quotes in the first sentence of the article. :book:

 

I disagree. I do not think "raving" is something we should share with the world. The issue is that most people judge the rave scene and the people involved with it in a negative way. People who are not familiar with the culture tend to just associate the scene and all aspects of it as "associated with drugs". SOME people may be open minded about learning more about the culture, but many, if not- MOST people will never understand it. Fact is, people in general are not open-minded enough to accept it.

 

This is also why GSC is against glowsticking in public. You cannot possibly educate everyone who sees you glowsticking,

and you are almost 100% likely to get judged by someone in a negative way. That's the truth. Said person is then likely to view glowsticking on the whole in the same negative light.

 

But what if somebody just wants to show what he/she likes to do. For example, in a party, with friends or not, somebody feels good and confident enough to rave for everyone to see. [i]This is not showing off,[/i] this is sharing. And it shouldn't be considered as a wrong action under these circumstances:question:

 

Again, you are using this general term "rave" as a verb, and I have no idea what you are talking about lol. However, there is nothing wrong with the scenario you have described. You friends would be more likely to view what you are doing in more positive light than random people in public would be. You are also able to have a conversation with them about glowsticking, and explain to them the general culture that glowsticking has. Mention that what you are doing is not associated with drugs. etc.

:arrow: You could still twist the situation to make it look like you are showing off though... Don't just crack sticks in the middle of two people talking lol. You still need to be responsible and use discretion when contemplating when and were you should glowsticking. That is an entirely different issue altogether, but I digress...

 

...this is sharing. And it shouldn't be considered as a wrong action under these circumstances:question:

I made a post a few months ago in this thread that elaborated on this part. It leads to another great reason why we should not be getting paid to glowstick. Let me quote the original article:

 

As for my opinion on the "people make money off of all kinds of other arts" thing, those arts came from radically different environments. Glowsticking and the light related dances came from the rave scene, which is all about caring / sharing / giving / love etc. In a sense, paying someone for glowsticking is like paying them for a hug. It's something that should have been given freely in the first place.

That pretty much sums it up... by glowsticking for money, you are disregarding a large cultural part of the rave scene, "which is all about caring / sharing / giving / love etc." You are no longer giving and sharing to others, you are in fact charging them for it.

 

A good raver knows that raving principles are extremely important, no matter the situation, and can wisely overcome any situation with the light of his/her glowsticks.

 

sorry. but you kinda made me facepalm after reading this.

 

If you have any questions about what I just wrote, feel free to PM me. (It is that little button that looks like a letter under my avatar)

 

If anyone else has anything to add, please feel free.

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A good raver knows that raving principles are extremely important, no matter the situation, and can wisely overcome any situation with the light of his/her glowsticks.;)

:[

Well, I must not be a good raver, then.

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Raving =/= Glowsticking.

 

To explain it more thoroughly:

 

Raving = Act of going to a rave.

 

Glowsticking/stringing = Dancing with glowsticks.

 

Going to a rave =/= Dancing with glowsticks.

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EDIT:Commence text wall!!I know some of you will see this post and say "wow that is way too long, I'm not reading that". READ THIS. Spend the next 5 minutes of your life learning about glowsticking culture. If you are a part of this community, this is in your best interest. First things firstThis article was not intended to be an "opinion of the author" type article. This is actually one of the issues that this whole community stands for. You are confusing the terms glowsticking, and "raving". When someone is glowsticking, it is not called "raving". The article wasn't about "raving culture", it was about "glowsticking culture". At GSC, we are concerned with preserving the original culture that ties along with glowsticking (although, the same culture could apply to the entire "rave" scene in general...)here is the thought process.Glowstring for money :arrow: competition for sponsorships. Competition has no place in glowsticking culture, or the rave scene in general. This also tends to lead to battling, since sponsors usually want to sponsor who they think are the "best" glowstickers. You did mention that you were against battling, but if someone is sponsored, glowsticking is all the sudden all about "who is better than everyone else". Other people will see that person getting paid to glowstick, and possibly say "hey, I'm better than him, why can't I get paid?". That person is now more inclined to battle the sponsored glowsticker in order to win favor by the sponsor. That is not what Glowsticking is about. As a community, we are strictly against battling. Furthermore, glowsticking for money can lead to people being viewed as unequal. One is a "better" glowsticker than another etc etc. This just goes against the original intentions behind the "rave scene" in general. I don't really think that is why we are against glowsticking for moneyThe issue is not that we don't want "greedy" people making money glowsticking. It is that we don't want anyone making money glowsticking. Being greedy, not having a strong education background, and having a bad set of moral principles is not really what we are trying to prevent here... We are trying to prevent exactly what I just listed above: battling, competition, and also people being viewed by others as "unequal" (among several other things). There are PLENTY of other ways to make money. If someone, like yourself, really cared about glowsticking, than why would you risk the deterioration of glowsticking culture by glowsticking for money? Worst case scenario, go work at McDonalds kids... I disagree. I do not think "raving" is something we should share with the world. The issue is that most people judge the rave scene and the people involved with it in a negative way. People who are not familiar with the culture tend to just associate the scene and all aspects of it as "associated with drugs". SOME people may be open minded about learning more about the culture, but many, if not- MOST people will never understand it. Fact is, people in general are not open-minded enough to accept it. This is also why GSC is against glowsticking in public. You cannot possibly educate everyone who sees you glowsticking, and you are almost 100% likely to get judged by someone in a negative way. That's the truth. Said person is then likely to view glowsticking on the whole in the same negative light. Again, you are using this general term "rave" as a verb, and I have no idea what you are talking about lol. However, there is nothing wrong with the scenario you have described. You friends would be more likely to view what you are doing in more positive light than random people in public would be. You are also able to have a conversation with them about glowsticking, and explain to them the general culture that glowsticking has. Mention that what you are doing is not associated with drugs. etc. :arrow: You could still twist the situation to make it look like you are showing off though... Don't just crack sticks in the middle of two people talking lol. You still need to be responsible and use discretion when contemplating when and were you should glowsticking. That is an entirely different issue altogether, but I digress... I made a post a few months ago in this thread that elaborated on this part. It leads to another great reason why we should not be getting paid to glowstick. Let me quote the original article:That pretty much sums it up... by glowsticking for money, you are disregarding a large cultural part of the rave scene, "which is all about caring / sharing / giving / love etc." You are no longer giving and sharing to others, you are in fact charging them for it. sorry. but you kinda made me facepalm after reading this.If you have any questions about what I just wrote, feel free to PM me. (It is that little button that looks like a letter under my avatar)If anyone else has anything to add, please feel free.

 

that was well said i liked how u broke it up into little suishi sized bits :D

 

also this is pretty much what i was gonna say

 

 

:[Well, I must not be a good raver, then.

 

LOL me neither aparently a friend and i went to a drum and bass party for NYE and the lady at the door turned to us and said " you know this is a drum and base party right?" facepalm

 

Raving =/= Glowsticking.To explain it more thoroughly:Raving = Act of going to a rave.Glowsticking/stringing = Dancing with glowsticks.Going to a rave =/= Dancing with glowsticks.

 

quoted for emphasis

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I don't believe people should be paid to glowstick at an event thats for sure. now if your doing fire performances somewhere, that may be a little different, and even then it shouldnt be something you are going out of your way to get "sponsored for". outside of free entry into the event and maybe payment for the fuel you used, you should be wanting to put on a show for people, just for the sake of the party, not to make yourself feel like some kind of badass. thats just ridiculous. just glowsticking isnt something that should be worth getting paid for... its what you do because you love it... not because you think your worth getting paid for... thats just dumb.

 

 

Also, on a side not, if you want to string in public, make some colorful sock poi. you can see them during the day, and they dont get the negative views that glowsticks get just for being glowsticks.

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Hi,

 

I know that this is my first post, but there are some things would like to say.

 

I don't want to enrage people, these are just my thoughts about this topic.

 

First of all, I totally agree, that competition is bad, when you do it to be better than everyone else. But also competition brings you forward in learning new things. Not that type of competition when you do battles (I hate battles, also in other scenes [e.g. dance]), but the intention to get better at what you are doing.

 

For me, there is no need in being better than anyone else, but if I see someone being better at something I want to learn, I'm jealous and think: "damn, I also want to be this good."

 

Its like a competition with myself. I want to be "better". Not better than others, but better than I am now.

 

And if I'm good at something, I wan't to show it. In my opinion, there is nothing wrong with that. If you just want to show the people, the beauty of what you are doing. And there is no difference between performing in public (without getting paid), and uploading a video on youtube. Except, that there might be more people that will see the video. But no one has a problem with that.

 

A few years ago, I got into trouble on melbshuffle.com. At this time (I don't know how it is now), the community had the opinion, that shuffling outside of raves or your house, is the badest thing you can do. Some of the older members had the opinion, that shuffling in a nightclub is at least as bad as shuffling on the streets.

 

But i didn't know that. I wrote my first Post, because I wanted to know, where to learn new moves. And some people where saying, go to raves, search youtube and so on. So i mentioned that there are no raves in my area, only some clubs, where the most people don't know, what shuffle is.

 

For that, i got the bash of my life. Some old members started to say things like "There is no place for people like you in rave culture", "You're ruining the rave scene" and some things, that I hadn't expected from ravers.

 

I heard from others, that some people there, just repeated what everyone else said, because they don't want to get bashed.

 

(I don't want to say that I am against melbshuffle.com or any of their members. I just think thats something, that should not happen in the rave scene!)

 

What i would like to say is:

I don't think that this is what the rave culture is ment to be. PLUR doesn't mean everyone is equal. People are not equal, but everyone should be treated with the same respect. No matter of what color their skin is or what language they speak. Rave culture is ment to be for everyone who wants to be a part of it, without hating the people who don't.

 

I know its hard for older members to see newcomers who don't follow the "guidlines", but I think its up to the older members to teach the newer ones, what the scene is all about and to be a good example for them.

 

I'm very new to glowsticking/glowstringing and I don't know if there are any glowstickers here in Austria (not Australia ^^) who are all in the scene. I have seen some, performing on stage, who came from completely other scenes. But these people are also a reason, why i want to learn it.

 

Yes, I think glowsticking is Art and we are the Artists, but without showing this Art to the World, how can there be new Artists?

 

If no one ever made a glowsticking video or performed outside of raves, then there wouldn't be as many people doing, loving and living it.

 

If you do a performance, for showing the beauty of the art, i personally think, that there is nothing wrong with it. If you have to travel for the show and get trip payed, plus free entrance and some drinks, i also think, that there is nothing wrong with it.

 

I also think, that there is not more unequality if you perform on stage, than usual.

Thats like saying: There is unequality, because one can do a move, everyone else can't, so he must stop, doing that move.

 

Equality should be in what people are, not what they do. Yeah, you might can think of, the people are breaking the "rules" when they perform on stage, because thats not unity. A long time i was against showcases for the same reason. I thougt, if you like to dance, stay in the club or something like that, but don't make it public on the streets or as public performance. But I changed my mind, when i first saw a raver in a pub. There was a bigger room with arcade machines in there and an electronic jukebox and he was in the middle of that room, dancing. So I started talking with him, if he doesn't think, what he does is a little bit odd, dancing in the middle of that room. And he said: "no, because I like to dance and would like share my passion with others."

 

And i think, that is what its about. If you're having a passion, you should be free to share it. And if someone pays you, for living your passion, then its even better, as long as you don't think, you gained a "higher level" then others which are doing the same, for free (or just get the travel paid).

 

At last:

Don't get me wrong. I'm not that kind of person, who wants to make money with glowsticking and I don't like to be on stage, I just think that its not as bad, as some people might think.

 

I also don't want to start some kind of flame war or something, these are just my thougts about this topic in general and I'm open for every opininion.

 

P.S.: I'm looking forward to a good time together.

 

Regards

 

 

Edit:

I forgot, not everywhere rave is automatically associated with drugs. :)

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^Not everyone's definition of competition is the same though. Most people think competition as people going against eachother to see who the better one is. Why not call it a workshop, if you're stringing and trying to learn new things and concepts. More so a positive term on it :)

 

Anywho welcome to the community/GS.c!

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