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Mixing high BPM to low bpm

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Hey guys, I was wondering what type of transitioning (or more over, how you even pull off a successful transition) is needed in order to go from high BPM (135) to low BPM (100).

 

You can't really change the BPM and beatmatch because then the record sounds odd...

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Watch this guys vids. Hes my favorite for learning things.

 

 

This can be done with 2 diffrent speeds, but it really depends on the song itself.

 

What I will do is if I have a track that is fast and I need to drop the tempo:

 

If I am going to blend the tracks together, then I will wait for track 1 (the fast one) to reach a breakdown in the song. At this point, I will reduce the speed a little bit. too much, and the crowd will hear it. Then I will speed up the 2nd one to where it can be mixed together. Once I mix to the 2nd track, I will bring it back down slowly when I get the chance.

 

Another one is the drop method, shown in the vid. In my opinion, this really depends on the song itself that your mixing to. If I am going to reduce speed, its because I am dropping a new genre. Listen to a mix that includes Drum n Bass and Dubstep. They work well as they sound close to each other (song wise, not speed wise). Doing this though is pretty tricky, and is a possible make-or-break moment in a crowd. It just depends what you are doing.

 

Hope that helps a bit.

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First off, just personal opinion-- like trance-rckr said, I wouldn't mix to a lower bpm at all unless I was switching genres; dropping the BPM that much within a genre kills energy buildup. Even if you jump genres, lowering the BPM can take a lot of energy out of a set unless you're going to a track with enough going on to hold the listener's attention. I know you're a trance fan-- what are you mixing that requires such a drastic drop?

 

But yeah. You can't do any sort of beat-matching crossfaded gradual transition-- I sometimes follow the method that Trance-rckr outlined above, bringing both songs to a safe midpoint, but I would only do this with songs within 5 or so bpm (even 6 or 6 is pushing it; if your first song is very fast, lowering the BPM by any amount is pretty noticeable) of each other. Any more than that, and it's too easy to notice.

 

For larger differences in tempo, I use an abrupt, well-timed transition at a break or silent beat in the previous song. But again, the songs have to have something in common to be able to pull that off- either energy level or style.

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First off, just personal opinion-- like trance-rckr said, I wouldn't mix to a lower bpm at all unless I was switching genres; dropping the BPM that much within a genre kills energy buildup. Even if you jump genres, lowering the BPM can take a lot of energy out of a set unless you're going to a track with enough going on to hold the listener's attention. I know you're a trance fan-- what are you mixing that requires such a drastic drop?

 

But yeah. You can't do any sort of beat-matching crossfaded gradual transition-- I sometimes follow the method that Trance-rckr outlined above, bringing both songs to a safe midpoint, but I would only do this with songs within 5 or so bpm (even 6 or 6 is pushing it; if your first song is very fast, lowering the BPM by any amount is pretty noticeable) of each other. Any more than that, and it's too easy to notice.

 

For larger differences in tempo, I use an abrupt, well-timed transition at a break or silent beat in the previous song. But again, the songs have to have something in common to be able to pull that off- either energy level or style.

 

I was just asking because I've been reading a lot about how sets should build up in BPM, but then eventually drop down and start all over again...

 

Technically I could use a brake effect or something like that right?

 

I picked some songs out the other day and saw that my playlist went from 135 to 124. That turned out nasty. I guess I learned that you just can't...do that...

 

Thanks for your guys' help though, I'm going to go practice more tonight.

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Where did you read this? I think maybe you misunderstood what you read. It's not a common practice for DJ's to vary the BPM too much. I had a copy of a set that Westbam did at The Love Parade where he wuz mixing up a storm. One track he just all of a sudden pushed up the pitch maybe 4 or 5 percent. Totally noticeable, but it worked and sounded good. He's the only DJ I've heard pull something like that off. A DJ could easily change the pitch a percent here or there. The average person prolly wouldn't even notice. But to go from 135-100 bpm would be very drastic. Maybe just for one song it would be easier to pull off. It all depend on your creativity. I've heard DJ's slip an old school or disco track into the middle of their sets. It's all about the track you play next.

 

Instead of a brake effect, why not try a power down? It's easier to practice mixing songs with similar BPM's. Once you've mastered that then you can move on to more advanced techniques. Start with the basic meng.

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try a backspin...i try to mix mostly everything like what DJ AM does and i managed a song at 128 bpm to 86 with a backspin and it worked pretty well

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