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ryan041493

starting stuff?

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for turntables i would go for technics they are not the most advanced record turntables anymore but ther are solid and do not lose there value, if you would sell them over 2 years you will get the same price back as u paid for it.

www.chemical-records.co.uk has a lot of records, 320kb/s mp3's and equipment.

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if you looking for a cheap mixer to play around with noting to hard core the M-audio X-session pro it's like $100 but it's just a mixer and it comes with torq nice little program other program would vdj have fun

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im looking to start out djing, and was going to buy a gemini-cdm 3600. do a couple of parties, earn some money, possibly become a pro dj. if life takes me somewhere else, ill just sell it and have the xp. anyway, is the gemini a good way to start mixing? comments/suggestions welcome!

 

thanks,

jay

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im looking to start out djing, and was going to buy a gemini-cdm 3600. do a couple of parties, earn some money, possibly become a pro dj. if life takes me somewhere else, ill just sell it and have the xp. anyway, is the gemini a good way to start mixing? comments/suggestions welcome!

 

thanks,

jay

 

Learning how to mix takes time, just like glowsticking. Just warning you, don't think that you can simply pick up two decks and instantly be amazing. I've been working on mixing skills for 2 months now, devoting part of my day to beatmatching. It's a lot of work, but if you like doing it, mixing is hella fun.

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Learning how to mix takes time, just like glowsticking. Just warning you, don't think that you can simply pick up two decks and instantly be amazing. I've been working on mixing skills for 2 months now, devoting part of my day to beatmatching. It's a lot of work, but if you like doing it, mixing is hella fun.

 

i gotcha. thanks man

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for turntables i would go for technics they are not the most advanced record turntables anymore but ther are solid and do not lose there value, if you would sell them over 2 years you will get the same price back as u paid for it.

www.chemical-records.co.uk has a lot of records, 320kb/s mp3's and equipment.

 

 

what model of technic turntable would you recommend for a beginner to intermediate dj? also, i was going to use serato so it would have to connect to a computer. thanks!

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Any turntable would work as long as they are not belt driven. Look for direct drive. It keeps the platter with torque and calibrated.

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what model of technic turntable would you recommend for a beginner to intermediate dj? also, i was going to use serato so it would have to connect to a computer. thanks!

 

I'll try to put my 2 cents in. I am looking to get into DJing as well and have done my fair bit of research and bugging a lot of people who are currently DJing. MadRaverRai has helped me a ton and got me started on researching. I believe any 1200 moel of Technics are very good and very stable. If you chose to go the CDJ route, check out Pioneer and Denon. The other ones aren't nearly as good.

 

You can choose from quite a bit of DVS's. DVS = Digital Vinyl System. Basically the programs that allow you to mix. There is Serato, Traktor and Virtual DJ that I know of. I haven't looked too much into mixers, but seen a lot of people using basic Numark mixers for beginning and upgrading if you get farther into it and know what you need.

 

As for sites, I would recommend www.agiprodj.com or www.audiolines.com. Always call or e-mail for a quote before you buy.

 

I got a TON of help from RaverRai here on gs.c and also from DJForums.com. Figured joining a forum helped me with glowsticking and my evo, so it would most likely help me with DJing :) Tons of info on those forums.

 

As for my set up that I decided to go with, I am choosing a Vestax VCI - 300. It's a DJ controller which essentially is 2 CDJs and a Mixer built together. Some KRK Rokit 5s for monitors and then I just have to find a nice pair of headphones which I've been told is mostly personal preference.

 

Hope I could help just a little bit :) GL and Hope to see you get into it!

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if you looking for a cheap mixer to play around with noting to hard core the M-audio X-session pro it's like $100 but it's just a mixer and it comes with torq nice little program other program would vdj have fun

 

 

 

i have this software on my laptop and the mixer.. the software is ok, but the mixer and program react slowly. turning a nob, or sliding a fader doesnt always sync with what you want to do

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Everything Jokur has said is the golden truth. Check DJForums for all your DJing questions: huge knowledge base there.

 

good starting hardware and software?

programs?

turntables?

mixers?

sites to order from?

etc?

The answer to most of these questions is "depends". What's your budget? Do you want to scratch? Play trance? Etc.

 

Technics turntables and Pioneer CDJs are the standard bits of kit you'll find in most pro clubs. Denon provides some good competition to Pioneer. Generally speaking, Denon has more features for the money, while Pioneer has better build quality at a higher price point. Technics are an ancient design that have become the de facto not because of their qualities so much as their patents preventing anyone else from making a decent competing product. That said, they have the most stable pitch, making them a good choice if you're into house or trance (i.e., good for lengthy mixes). Never buy Technics new unless you're absolutely loaded: good used decks are about $250-300 each. If you're into scratching, definitely go for something with more torque and other turntablist features: Vestax PDX series, Stanton STR8-150, etc.

 

Just about any old mixer is fine for mixing. Pioneer's last good mixer was made around 2005. Allen and Heath's Xone series, Ecler's Nuo and HAK series, and anything by Rane are all very solid choices. On a budget, check out the American Audio QD5-MK2. It's about $150, but has surprisingly good build quality and a solid feature set. However, you can mix on just about anything; I started on a $50 Numark, and many of my friends and colleagues started on $50-100 piece-of-junk-but-works-for-learning mixers.

 

Scratching tends to require a more robust crossfader and upfaders, an uncluttered fader area, hamster switch (usually labeled "crossfader reverse"), fader curve controls, and transform switches/buttons. Scratch mixers start at about $300. Lesser mixers will either lack the features you need, break quickly under turntablist abuse, or both.

 

Amazon and AGIProDJ are the two best online stores. Another great strategy is to find the lowest price you can and get Guitar Center to match it (I've gotten them down to cost + $1 in the past).

 

Create a DJForums.com account. Lurk. Do not post. Just lurk and use the search function. When you finally get gear, practice consistently. Building up a library of killer music is much more important than any piece of gear you will ever own. Throw your own parties. Hand out business cards. Do everything you can to promote yourself. Get any gigs you can starting out. Play for free the first few times to get your foot in the door, but after that set a fair price; don't let anyone walk over you. Don't wait to be discovered. Don't wait to be invited.

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