Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

jkim070

LED Gloves Instructions

31 posts in this topic

Hi all. New here on glowsticking.com. I made some LED gloves this past month for monster massive. It took me about 3 hours to make but it was lots of fun, especially after youre done and u turn them on! Bright as hell! =) Anyways, If enough people are interested, i was thinking about making a tutorial on how to make LED gloves with a list of things you will need and where u can get them etc. Reply to this thread if you want me to make one and post it on here. If enough people reply, ill post it in time for monster massive =)

 

 

led3.jpg

led2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very cool! I'd like to see a tutorial on how to make them.

 

And welcome to glowsticking.com!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tutorial please, i have made some but they have some deffects! still working on them!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yea, i saw those vids too. Teardrop and Wongton's gloves are basically gloves with Inova Microlights in them. So if each Inova Microlight goes for about 7-8 bucks x 10 = about 70-80 bucks for 2 gloves. I didn't want to spend that much lol so i just came up with something on my own. The gloves i made only cost me about 12-14 bucks. 2 dollars for the black cotton gloves, 2 battery holders (1.20 each at radio shack), 2 switches (2 bucks at electronics or hardware store) and LED's which are about 10 cents each. The wires i got from an old battery supply for a PC lol. But yea, Ill finish the Instructions by Saturday (october 18th). A week should be good enough to make a pair of gloves =) check back tomorrow night!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome bc I bought a ton of LEDs and I wanna make a set but haven't seen a good tutorial on making gloves! Thank you!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sweet, can't wait to see the instructions as i was thinking doing something like that but I got lazy lol. Actually, if you go to:

 

Cheap color changing LED's

 

a set of white gloves with some photons stuck inside are pretty cheap. Also, this allows a relatively easy way to change colors out if you want as they have white, strobbing white, solid colors, and multicolor LED for super dang cheap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 7 pack of the color changers, 10 white ones (well 9 one was dim) and 10 green...all of which glow nicely and work great!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry it took so long guys. Here's the instructions

 

 

What you will need:

-A pair of black or white cotton gloves ($2.00 at a swap meet or flea market)

- 2 Button Battery Holders ($1.19 each at radio shack)

-2 Rocker Switches (Make sure they’re not “Temporary On†switches) ($1.00 at hardware store)

-10 LED’s (I prefer blue and green because they are brightest without having to use resistors)

-I used 3mm LED’s

-4 Button Batteries (CR 2016 Cell Batteries)

-Needle and Thread

- Solder Iron (Not needed, but more secure this way)

- Electrical Tape

- Thin Wire (can be found in old electronics or old power supply for PC

glovestuffuneed.jpg

 

Wire the LED’s to the thin wires. Make sure you know positive and negative. Strip end of the wires. Make sure they are long enough to reach your wrist. And make sure you know which color LED’s they are. Wrap electrical tape at the top of the LED wires. When taping, make sure you tape one side first, and then the other side to make sure that the “–“ and “+†don’t touch.

glovestep1.jpg

turn the gloves inside out. At the tip of each finger, cut a very small slit at the tips.

Note: make sure you know which side is up when you are wearing it. All the wires should be sewed onto the top of the glove.

 

glovestep2.jpg

 

 

Start sewing in the LED’s to the finger tips. Put needle through cloth, and then wrap a couple of times around the LED’s and sew it back into the cloth. Make sure its TIGHT.

Repeat for all fingertips.

glovestep3.jpg

Sew each pair of wires to the glove near the knuckle area to keep them in place.

 

 

Wiring: All the positives go together and all the negatives go together.

Solder or connect all the positive wires to a single wire and do the same for negative also.

[strip the ends of the wires, and twist all together with the single wire. Make sure it can’t come loose]

glovestep4.jpg

Wire the negative to one of the switch’s prongs.

Connect another wire to the switch’s other prong and wire the other end to the negative on the battery.

Connect the positive to the positive of the battery holder.

Connect the loose negative wire to the negative on the battery.

 

The final product should look like the bottom right corner picture.

glovestep5.jpg

 

Now, you can sew the wires into the gloves so they don’t move around and to make it clean.

Make sure to cover all open wires in electrical tape for safety reasons.

2 CR2016 cell batteries should be good for one glove.

 

Turn the switch on and enjoy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a great writeup, maybe you can add a 2nd set of lights onto a 2nd switch and go back and forth between the colors or BAM! all at once, lol. Or add a 2nd switch to set it up with a capacitors in line for a strobe effect lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey bud! Just noticed that those lights are outside the gloves, so are they often too bright?'

 

Is there a way to wire this with different batteries? I would think that the smaller lithium batteries would die rather quickly. Can you use maybe a small battery pack of AAA, AA or 9v (9v is probably too much power without a way to cut power down)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yea, thats definitely a possibility to add a second switch and another set of LED's. I just didnt have much time to add it in haha.

 

And as for the batteries, i tried using 2 tripe A batteries. It doesnt get as bright as the CR2016. Not sure how long they will last, but so far so good. and i think 9 volt would be too much lol. I tried wiring some led's together with a 9v before i made the gloves (cause i knew nothing about wiring LED's) and 2 of them actually got fried as soon as i turned on the switch =/ might be kind of dangerous. I purchased some purple LED's today and they work too so maybe u guys can put that into the glove with the white, green, and blue haha. =)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's cause most LED's are wired to need 3.2 to 3.4 volts or somewhere around there. A 9volt would give too much juice and burn out the element while 2 aaa would not give enough juice unless you transformed it somehow. Although the flowtoys i just picked up use only a single AAA but run 3 leds in various patterns and its dang bright.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm...Well I don't really do much at work so I think I will go ahead and research this subject a bit more. Being able to use rechargable AA or AAA batteries would the the pimp shit. So let me do some research on it and I'll post back and let you know if I figured it out or not!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay I did some research, and what about a 3v camera battery? Not only can they be rechargable, but they have to potential to hold up with that kind of output for around 22 hours...One of those 3v batteries may be enough to power all those lights for that long, its rechargable and the battery pack can then either be put in a sweat band on each wrist or built into the elastic wrist of the gloves themselves (I'm actually going to look at using batting gloves as well as white cotton ones).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I still think you would need some sort of stepup to pump up the juice a bit, maybe run 3 rechargable 1.5 AA or AAA in series to give 4.5 volts? Don't know if that will burn out the filament though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites